Whats up with the Fats!?

23 . 07 . 2015 by aaron

Whats up with the Fats!?

Fats are many times viewed as the dark horse in the eyes of the average person in our society today. Told many claims that fats will increase the risk of heart disease, high cholesterol, increase fat deposition, and even diabetes. In all actual reality fats actually do the exact opposite in the negative view it sometimes is given.

Here is a list of some of the positive attributes of fats within the body:
-PROVIDES ENERGY AND STORAGE SPOTS OF ENERGY TO BE USED
-TRANSPORTS FAT SOLUBLE VITAMINS SUCH AS A, D, E AND K
-PROVIDES INSULATION AND REGULATION OF CORE BODY TEMPERATURE
-HELPS IN BRAIN DEVELOPMENT FROM INFANCY THAT CONITNUES IN ADULT HOOD
-HELPS FACILIATE BLOOD CLOTTING AND REGULATION OF INFLAMMATION WITHIN THE BODY
-HELPS STRENGHTNEN CONNECTIVE TISSUE AS WELL AS FORTIFIED HEALTH IN HAIR, NAILS AND SKIN
-TRANSPORT HORMONES THAT AID IN BOTH TESTOSTERONE AND THYROID PRODUCTION (SATURATED AND OMEGA SOURCES0
-REBUILD MUSCLE TISSUE AND FACILIATE PROTEIN FOR RECOVERY

Fast Food Quote Banner
These above only amount to a few reasons why fats should always be incorporated within the diet. The only major concern is source and types of fats we do intake. With that being said, we mistaken the quality source of fats for being the cause of many of our current day illnesses. Now if you were to incorporate fast food or packaged/processed goods that are loaded with saturated fats then of course that’s a problem. First, let’s break down the “fats” model.

Saturated Fats-usually found in animal products, including meat and milk, increase your body’s levels of bad cholesterol
Unsaturated Fats-found in fish, nuts, olive oil, canola oil and vegetable oil, are considered “good fats” and have more of a positive effect on cholesterol levels by lowering LDLs and Increasing our HDLs
Trans Fats-which found in fried foods, processed foods, spreads and baked goods (example-McDonalds, Debbie cakes, pop tarts, etc ANYTHING THAT HAS MORE THAN A FEW INGREDIENTS AND HAS A SHELF LIFE OF MORE THAN 1-2 MONTHS)

The latter one listed below we always want to minimize this in a diet regimen. I always want to incorporate more fresh or frozen sources. Those sources that do have the “multi-ingredients” labeling will always contain some sorts of Trans fat in the forms of polysaturated, hydrogenated, partially hydrogenated or even soybean oil. The model I like to use the 40/40/20 diet with most people. Fat ranging from 15-20 % and 20-25 % of that falling within the category of saturated fats.

Example:
3000 calorie diet (40 % carbohydrates, 1200 calories= 300 grams; 40% proteins, 1200 calories= 300 grams; 20% fats, 600 calories~66.7 grams). Of that 600 calories or 66.7 grams of fat would hit the range of 13-16 grams of saturated fats.

MY PERSONAL IDEAL SOURCES OF SATURATED FATS:
**COCONUT OIL- 1 TBSP (14 GRAMS); TOTAL FAT: 13.5 GRAMS, SATURATED 11.7 GRAMS, OMEGA-6 243 MGS
**AVOCADO-1 OZ (28 GRAMS); TOTAL FAT: 4.3 GRAMS, SATURATED 0.6 GRAMS, OMEGA-3 30.8 MGS, OMEGA-6 473 MGS
**ALMONDS-1 OZ (28 GRAMS); TOTAL FAT: 13.8 GRAMS, SATURATED 1.0 GRAMS, OMEGA-3 1.7 MGS, OMEGA-6 3,378 MGS
**WALNUTS- 1 OZ (28 GRAMS); TOTAL FAT: 18.3 GRAMS, SATURATED 1.7 GRAMS, OMEGA-3 2542 MGS, OMEGA-6 10,666 GRAMS
**MACADAMIAN NUTS- 1 OZ (28 GRAMS); TOTAL FAT: 21.2 GRAMS, SATURATED 3.4 GRAMS, OMEGA-3 57.7 MGS, OMEGA-6 363 MGS

Even the above source have different mixtures and ratios between Saturated fats, Omega-3, and Omega-6 Fatty Acids. I do like to incorporate at least 2-3 different sources of saturated fats including also from meat sources like beef and turkey. Bison is a great source with a great protien/fat ratio. Always keep the sources of fats mixed with different food that will in the end benefit your body’s overall healthy and recovery!

Follow Dr. Trey Hodge on Instagram @DrTeamHodge
drteamhod

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *